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Mobile health and medical apps weekly is out!

Read our newspaper about mobile health and medical applications!

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Calculate risk of stroke on Apple Watch

Read a review of our stroke app on iMedicalApps! via iMedicalApps.

New version of MedCalc for Apple Watch

We just released a new version of our Medical for Apple Watch application!

Version 2.2 introduces new scores and tools:

  • Ideal body weight calculation is now included with BMI and BSA
  • Corticosteroid equivalence calculator
  • CAGE questionnaire (screening of alcoholism)
  • Centor Score (probability of strep pharyngitis)

Medical for Apple Watch is a great tool for physicians and medical students. Previous versions already contained several tools including:

  • BMI, BSA calculation
  • eGFR
  • Cardiovascular scores:
    ABCD2, CHA2DS2 VASc, corrected QT, HEART Score, PE probability

It is fully optimized for Watch OS2!

The price ($0.99) remains unchanged! So don’t hesitate to take a look and try by yourself by clicking here

 

 

Emergency medicine and internal medicine trainees’ smartphone use in clinical settings in the United States

Purpose:
Smartphone technology offers a multitude of applications (apps) that provide a wide range of functions for healthcare professionals. Medical trainees are early adopters of this technology, but how they use smartphones in clinical care remains unclear. Our objective was to further characterize smartphone use by medical trainees at two US academic institutions, as well as their prior training in the clinical use of smartphones.
Methods:
In 2014, we surveyed 347 internal medicine and emergency medicine resident physicians at the University of Utah and Brigham and Women’s Hospital about their smartphone use and prior training experiences. Scores (0%–100%) were calculated to assess the frequency of their use of general features (email, text) and patient-specific apps, and the results were compared according to resident level and program using the Mann-Whitney U test.
Results:
A total of 184 residents responded (response rate, 53.0%). The average score for using general features, 14.4/20 (72.2%) was significantly higher than the average score for using patient-specific features and apps, 14.1/44(33.0%; P < 0.001). The average scores for the use of general features, were significantly higher for year 3–4 residents, 15.0/20 (75.1%) than year 1–2 residents, 14.1/20 (70.5%; P=0.035), and for internal medicine residents, 14.9/20 (74.6%) in comparison to emergency medicine residents, 12.9/20 (64.3%; P = 0.001). The average score reflecting the use of patient-specific apps was significantly higher for year 3–4 residents, 16.1/44 (36.5%) than for year 1–2 residents, 13.7/44 (31.1%; P = 0.044). Only 21.7% of respondents had received prior training in clinical smartphone use.
Conclusions:
Residents used smartphones for general features more frequently than for patient-specific features, but patient-specific use increased with training. Few residents have received prior training in the clinical use of smartphones.

via J Educ Eval Health Prof

HCV-Related Central and Peripheral Nervous System Demyelinating Disorders

Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with a large spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs), mostly immunologic/rheumatologic in nature owing to B-cell proliferation and clonal expansion. Neurological complications are thought to be immune-mediated or secondary to invasion of neural tissues by HCV, as postulated in transverse myelitis and encephalopathic forms. Primarily axonal neuropathies, including sensorimotor polyneuropathy, large or small fiber sensory neuropathy, motor polyneuropathy, mononeuritis, mononeuritis multiplex, or overlapping syndrome, represent the most common neurological complications of chronic HCV infection. In addition, a number of peripheral demyelinating disorders are encountered, such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, the Lewis-Sumner syndrome, and cryoglobulin-associated polyneuropathy with demyelinating features. The spectrum of demyelinating forms also includes rare cases of iatrogenic central and peripheral nervous system disorders, occurring during treatment with pegylated interferon. Herein, we review HCV-related demyelinating conditions, and disclose the novel observation on the significantly increased frequency of chronic demyelinating neuropathy with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein antibodies in a cohort of 59 consecutive patients recruited at our institution. We also report a second case of neuromyelitis optica with serum IgG autoantibody against the water channel aquaporin-4. The prompt recognition of these atypical and underestimated complications of HCV infection is of crucial importance in deciding which treatment option a patient should be offered.

via Inflamm Allergy Drug Targets

A comparison of the brief international cognitive assessment for multiple sclerosis and the brief repeatable battery in multiple sclerosis patients

Background

Recently, a Brief International Cognitive Assessment for Multiple Sclerosis (BICAMS) has been developed as an international and standardized brief cognitive test, which is easily performed in everyday clinical practice for neuropsychological assessment in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, we need to gather more information about this tool compared to other neuropsychological batteries. The aim of our study is to compare the performance of BICAMS and Brief Repeatable Battery (BRB) in MS subjects.

Methods

Tests of the BRB and BICAMS were administered to MS patients recruited from 11 Italian MS centres. Cognitive impairment (CI) was defined as the failure on at least two tests (scores below the fifth percentile) on the BRB and as the failure on at least one test of the BICAMS. The agreement between the performances on the two batteries was assessed through Cohen’s K statistic. Finally we calculated the effects sizes for each test of the two batteries using Cohen’s d.

Results

The two batteries were administered to 192 MS patients (142 women, 50 men; mean age 41.4 ± 10.8 years, mean education 12.3 ± 3.5 years). Mean scores of patients were lower compared to those of healthy subjects in all the cognitive measures examined. Forty-six MS patients were identified as impaired and 48 as unimpaired on both of the batteries, when the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) was included in the analysis. Cohen’s K statistic was 0.46 which corresponds to a moderate accord. If the SDMT was excluded from the BRB, 37 MS patients were identified as impaired and 57 as unimpaired on both of the batteries. Cohen’s K statistic was 0.3 which corresponds to a poor accord. The SDMT, the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) 3 and 2 yielded higher d values (SDMT 0.83, PASAT 3 0.65, PASAT 2 0.84).

Conclusions

This study confirms the feasibility of BICAMS in everyday clinical practice for the identification of CI and highlights the good psychometric properties of the SDMT.

via BMC Neurology